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Breaktru Forum  |  eCigarette Forum  |  Modding  |  Topic: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
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Author Topic: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit  (Read 262524 times)

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Offline CraigHB

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #200 on: April 04, 2014, 04:50:04 PM »
Automotive electrical systems can provide notoriously spikey power supplies.  When you do things like turning on the headlights and starting the engine you get very large spikes in the electrical system.  Normally you have to use "automotive rated" parts for automotive applications.  That just means they are tolerant to 35V.

Electrical spikes in automotive electrical systems rarely get above 35V, but big load dumps can cause spikes as high as 100V.  A big load dump can happen when you do something like jump start another car.  This can sometimes even damage parts that do have automotive ratings.  So, think twice next time someone asks you to give them a jump start.  Always do it with the ignition off.  Gunning your engine while jump starting another car could fry your car's electrical system.

In any case, electrical systems in cars are not all created equal.  If you car has a particularly noisy electrical system, it could possibly fry your OKR regulators.  They are not automotive rated.  What you need to do is add a TVS circuit (transient voltage suppressor)  to your cig lighter adapter.  It's just a simple circuit with a big cap, a TVS diode and a rectifier.  Those are widely available and inexpensive parts.

Offline M0n0

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #201 on: April 04, 2014, 05:01:48 PM »
Happy Friday!!!!! Digi tech sent me a giant box so im gonna be building all weekend!!!!

That's really good to know...I'm getting into these technologies after working with electromechanical control work..it's cool to learn more!

I just re-mapped my circuit and have a definite failure on one okr chip, I'm going to assume #2 died in battle as well...

What do you guys think about this one I built? (Before I box it up this time) haha

Offline CraigHB

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #202 on: April 04, 2014, 05:23:43 PM »
I actually kind of spaced on that, I saw cig lighter adapter and passthru and thought you were using a passthru in a car, so nevermind on that.  Probably good info anyway.  Lots of people use passhtrus running off the cig lighter adapter in a car.

Offline M0n0

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #203 on: April 04, 2014, 05:36:44 PM »
Yeah I was lol...I am just testing it all over 12v power...that's great to know because seeing the power of the chip in action, I'm thinking about a car set up with it now. That's gonna be the chip layout there but now I want to add rev polarity circuit and need to dig into reading about some form of conditioner.

I forgot to mention all my equipment on my work bench runs through a power conditioner, so around dirty power it's definately a good explanation for these failures.

Offline M0n0

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #204 on: April 04, 2014, 06:12:08 PM »
http://www.comchiptech.com/cms/UserFiles/CPDQ5V0-HF%20RevA825126.pdf

Wouldn't this work for both reverse polarity/spikes and zener functions?

Offline wreck

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #205 on: April 05, 2014, 11:18:26 AM »
Right. I've got my mod laid out on the breadboard, using the 5.6 zener, and it is still cutting out when the batteries are at around 3.7-3.8V each...

Any ideas why the cut off is happening so early?

These are the zeners I've been using:

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/productdetail.jsp?SKU=1861448

This is really frustrating me, as I really want to add under voltage shut off, but having it so early is making the battery life dreadful...

Offline mamu

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #206 on: April 05, 2014, 12:16:05 PM »
Right. I've got my mod laid out on the breadboard, using the 5.6 zener, and it is still cutting out when the batteries are at around 3.7-3.8V each...

Any ideas why the cut off is happening so early?

These are the zeners I've been using:

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/productdetail.jsp?SKU=1861448

This is really frustrating me, as I really want to add under voltage shut off, but having it so early is making the battery life dreadful...

Is 3.7v - 3.8v the loaded or unloaded cutoff voltage? 

If it's the unloaded cutoff voltage, what is the loaded cutoff voltage?  If it's around 6v then the 5.6v zener is doing its job and not the cause of the issue.

And if that's the case the batts are really sagging under load and being stressed.

Check the batts (some have high internal resistance - the Sony 30A batts have the lowest internal resistance and cut off at 3.1v - 3.2v unloaded), check the batt holder, check the batt contacts, check that you used 20ga wiring input/output - there is added resistance coming from one or more of those sources that is causing the high unloaded cutoff voltage.

Offline wreck

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #207 on: April 05, 2014, 12:35:04 PM »
Is 3.7v - 3.8v the loaded or unloaded cutoff voltage? 

If it's the unloaded cutoff voltage, what is the loaded cutoff voltage?  If it's around 6v then the 5.6v zener is doing its job and not the cause of the issue.

And if that's the case the batts are really sagging under load and being stressed.

Check the batts (some have high internal resistance - the Sony 30A batts have the lowest internal resistance and cut off at 3.1v - 3.2v unloaded), check the batt holder, check the batt contacts, check that you used 20ga wiring input/output - there is added resistance coming from one or more of those sources that is causing the high unloaded cutoff voltage.

It is the loaded cut off that is occurring at 3.7-3.8V.

I'm only experiencing a drop of about 0.05V between unloaded and loaded...

I've got it set up on my bread board with 20ga wire throughout, have tried a couple of different battery holders with the same results.

The batteries I've been testing with are efest 800mah IMR 18350s...

Do the zeners I linked to look okay? It's the first time I've ever used them, and was unsure of which to purchase.

« Last Edit: April 05, 2014, 12:38:24 PM by wreck »

Offline mamu

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #208 on: April 05, 2014, 01:00:55 PM »
If the loaded voltage is 3.7v - what is the unloaded voltage?  It must be nearly charged to cut off under load that high.

I don't believe the zener is the issue.  The specs of the one you linked to looks fine.   Take the zener out of line and see if you get the same results with cutoff voltage.  If you do get the same results, then you'll need to figure out where the added resistance is coming from.

...The batteries I've been testing with are efest 800mah IMR 18350s...

I'll wager there's your problem - those batts are only 6.4A capable plus Efest batts have high internal resistance and inherently cut out at higher voltages.

If you have any Sony or LG 30A 18650 batts, try those and see if you get better results.

Offline wreck

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #209 on: April 05, 2014, 01:10:54 PM »
Sorry, I was getting confused with loaded/unloaded I think...

When it cuts off, the batteries read 3.7V each unloaded when using my multimeter. The voltmeter I've included in my breadboard set up fades, and the atties stops firing. When I remove the atty, the voltmeter comes back on, and reads the correct voltage.

I've got another box I made using the OKR without a zener in it, and the efests will drain to about 3.0V before it starts strugging

The mod I want to build this into is a twin 18350, so I'll try it with a couple of AW IMRs, and see if I get better results I think...

I'll also test with some 10A 18650 panasonics I have too to be sure, but really I want to be using 18350s.

Offline wreck

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #210 on: April 06, 2014, 02:07:24 PM »
Well, it looks like the batteries were my issue...

I swapped for a set of AWs, and the batteries are currently at about 3.4V and are still going strong :)

Time to bin those old efests I think.

Thanks for the advice Mamu  :beer-toast:

I'm now wondering whether the issues I was having with my PTN04050 box were down to the efests  :Thinking: shame the mod is now in pieces on my desk due to the rage it made me get into!!

Offline M0n0

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #211 on: April 06, 2014, 02:12:23 PM »
I rebuilt my passthru and it's working great...still don't know why ver 1 was killing boards, except I haven't attempted to use cars as a voltage source..


Offline Dropsomegears

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #212 on: April 07, 2014, 09:44:23 AM »
Hello to all,

I've been reading and seeing a lot of you guys on the forums, FB and it is nice to see everyone is as helpful as ever. I have some questions. 

I wired up and soldered a Okr 10 last week. Installed it didnt fire and the battery on the left got hot.  Ok Rome wasnt built in a day... I have a short somewhere. While trying to investigate this week ( I have a 2 year old so play time is once a week) My pot took a dump and fell apart.  :wallbash:. Sooo I started fresh and laid out up a new complete layout worked and I soldered it up and Bam ITS ALIVE!!!!!   But my batt still gets hot. Its the one on the left doesnt matter which. Plus I think I smell a lil burning from the wire that goes from the batt on the left + to the batt on the rights -. So I'm going to rewire that and see if that fixes the heat up battery. I wanted to post this just to see what input you all have. Oh and side not I didnt pay attention to see if the battery heated up while on the bread board  =\

I did not realize how much room is needed lol everything looks small and you think oh yeah that will fit. lol.


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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #213 on: April 07, 2014, 10:13:10 AM »
Dropsomegears:
It could be the one battery is bad.
Also, I see they are button tops. Make sure the contacts on your batt holder is providing enough pressure on the batt. It can be a source of high resistance which would cause heat and voltage drop.
Check for a cold solder battery wire connection which would also cause a high resistance (heat) path. You want to heat the wire and contact point with the soldering iron before applying solder. You DON'T want to melt the solder on to the wire/contact.

Offline Dropsomegears

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #214 on: April 07, 2014, 11:08:29 AM »
Dropsomegears:
It could be the one battery is bad.
Also, I see they are button tops. Make sure the contacts on your batt holder is providing enough pressure on the batt. It can be a source of high resistance which would cause heat and voltage drop.
Check for a cold solder battery wire connection which would also cause a high resistance (heat) path. You want to heat the wire and contact point with the soldering iron before applying solder. You DON'T want to melt the solder on to the wire/contact.

Thanks will do.

Also is there an average working temp for the batts? I used my temp gun and they were at room temp 70 deg then both went to 75 and stayed there for a few min. But  not firing an atty (still attached) I waited to see and then the one started to rise to around 95 then I unplugged it.  I've babied these batts. I bought them locally for my lavatube 2.5 and when the volts dropped down to 3.8 - 3.7 I swapped it out and put a fresh one in and on the charger it went.

I was told that the batteries we use have similar chemical makeup (or same) to Lipos so I try and treat batteries like my R/C batts. Store for long periods of time at 3.8 dont go near cut off 3.3 and slowly charge when possible. (Slow is 1 amp for big R/C batteries).

I could have sworn I saw someone here saying do not use VTC4's or alike on these and just use a normal non special battery (another reason why I wanted to make this mod). Any suggestions on batteries?

Sorry for the repeats on noob questions. (at work and research time is limited).



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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #215 on: April 07, 2014, 11:54:15 AM »
Stacking batteries that have no protection can be dangerous. It's good that you are using PTC fuses. Also these batteries are LiMN which are a safer chemistry than Li-Ion.

Are you saying that the temp climbs when you put them in the battery holder w/ no load? Are you pressing the fire button when they heat up or is it happening just sitting idle?

Offline Dropsomegears

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #216 on: April 07, 2014, 02:02:44 PM »
Stacking batteries that have no protection can be dangerous. It's good that you are using PTC fuses. Also these batteries are LiMN which are a safer chemistry than Li-Ion.

Are you saying that the temp climbs when you put them in the battery holder w/ no load? Are you pressing the fire button when they heat up or is it happening just sitting idle?

Slight climb while using. But rises when not firing.

To me it solidifies your other tip to check for a cold joint in the battholder. I tried it with either batt in the left slot and which ever batt was in the left slot got warmer. I'm just glad I remebered to use my IR Temp gun to monitor.  :D

I'll double check the tray make sure there are no metal shaving or any foreign object creating a short. ( I am multi tasking with projects)

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #217 on: April 07, 2014, 02:59:41 PM »
Slight climb while using. But rises when not firing.

Sounds like you have a partial short or leakage. Check your wiring carefully

Offline david4500

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #218 on: April 09, 2014, 05:24:35 PM »
Thank you for this thread. Finished my build over the weekend. Wiring isn't pretty, just happy it works.


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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #219 on: April 09, 2014, 06:21:00 PM »
Thank you for this thread. Finished my build over the weekend. Wiring isn't pretty, just happy it works.

Well done David  :rockin smiley: Congratulations  :applaude:

Offline mamu

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #220 on: April 12, 2014, 01:54:16 AM »
I've been doing some more testing with the OKR-T10.

The 1K ohm pull-down resister is causing a major concern with the current drain.  The 5.6v zener is kicking in to cut off the OKR from firing at 6v under load, but the batts if left in the mod after the cutoff continue to drain and with the 1K ohm resister drain at a faster rate.  The series batts drained down to 5v.  oh_my:

I've re-breadboarded the setup and replaced the 1K ohm resister with a 4.7K ohm resister and so far good to go.  With my previous setup I couldn't do higher than 2K without getting auto-firing with the zener inline.  Now I'm thinking it was the funky breadboard I was using because now with the new breadboard a higher resistance is doing fine.

I've updated the wiring guide to reflect this.


Offline thejewk

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #221 on: April 12, 2014, 05:00:34 AM »
Thanks to this thread and a package from digikey yesterday, I knocked up an okr t10 mod yesterday in a chuffing great plastic box and on first impressions it's performing brilliantly. Don't have under voltage protection or a voltmeter in yet, but this is just a test build while waiting for more parts and until I find a better case. I am thinking of making a wooden box from layers of mahogany sheet, but I have never done anything like that before so it may take some time.

For battery life, does the resistance of your coil have any effect? I have a build using 2x18650s using a kis3r33s which I generally run at 4.4 volts and the battery life is brilliant. On this mod I have a 0.5 ohm dual coil with the same voltage of 4.4 which is obviously giving significantly greater power, but will it give me less run time as a result?

Keep up the good work folks.

Offline fullthrown

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #222 on: April 12, 2014, 11:46:08 PM »
I know i'm a little late to the party, but I had a few questions regarding the schematic that i'm following.
1. What is the purpose of the on/off (sw2) switch in this schematic?

2. I saw Mamu's last reply on using a 4.7 ohm resistor instead of a 1 ohm resistor. Will i be fine using a 2ohm resistor?

3. Based on Mamu's schematic, where would the vout pin on the on/off/on switch go? (sorry if its a noobish question).

4. Lastly, has anyone used a touch button in an okr build? If so, how would I be able to work it into this build.

Offline david4500

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #223 on: April 13, 2014, 01:11:32 AM »

1. What is the purpose of the on/off (sw2) switch in this schematic?

3. Based on Mamu's schematic, where would the vout pin on the on/off/on switch go? (sorry if its a noobish question).

- disconnect fire button

- wire to either the vout pin on okr or 510 positive pin

Offline fullthrown

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #224 on: April 13, 2014, 01:57:27 AM »
Ah, got it. Thank you!

Offline michamer

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #225 on: April 13, 2014, 08:38:52 AM »
I know i'm a little late to the party, but I had a few questions regarding the schematic that i'm following.

What is the purpose of the on/off (sw2) switch in this schematic?


I'm not an expert but I don't see why an on/off for pin 1 would help.
From my understanding, the on/off would be practical on the battery to pin 2.

Offline david4500

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #226 on: April 13, 2014, 06:39:13 PM »
I'm not an expert but I don't see why an on/off for pin 1 would help.
From my understanding, the on/off would be practical on the battery to pin 2.

on-off switch on pin 1 would disconnect button to prevent pocket firing.

on-off switch on pin 2 would disconnect battery to prevent current drain.

current drain mentioned here:

http://breaktru.com/smf/index.php/topic,907.msg10176.html#msg10176

Offline fullthrown

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #227 on: April 13, 2014, 09:14:14 PM »
"on-off switch on pin 1 would disconnect button to prevent pocket firing.
on-off switch on pin 2 would disconnect battery to prevent current drain.
current drain mentioned here:
http://breaktru.com/smf/index.php/topic,907.msg10176.html#msg10176"

David4500- If I put the on/off on pin 2, between the okr and the mosfet, wouldn't this be killing two birds with one stone. The chip wont have any power, making the button inoperable?

Offline david4500

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #228 on: April 13, 2014, 09:35:28 PM »
yeah both switches wouldn't be needed. just pick the one you'd feel would suit your needs best.

Offline fullthrown

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #229 on: April 14, 2014, 10:32:12 PM »
Awesome. I think i'll still go with the first. I'll just make sure that I take my batteries out if it's going to be sitting for a long time. I have a few other question though if anyone is willing to help me out. I started soldering the chip and was wondering if this looks ok? I don't have a breadboard on hand so I cant really wire everything unless i'm putting it in the box itself, or at least it would be a major pain to do so. Is this the way that most of your chips look after soldering? Any tips? The contacts aren't touching and the heat shrink is just for added protection.

The chip did seem to get quite hot when soldering, although I did start and stop making sure to not let it get too hot. Is it possible for the chip to become damaged from too much heat, from soldering?

My last question is if any of you have used a strip of metal as a ground. I used keystone battery contacts instead of a battery holder, making it somewhat difficult to solder every ground to it. And the box is made out of wood so I cant really make that the ground either. Any tips? Thanks

Offline CraigHB

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #230 on: April 14, 2014, 11:49:56 PM »
For battery life, does the resistance of your coil have any effect? I have a build using 2x18650s using a kis3r33s which I generally run at 4.4 volts and the battery life is brilliant. On this mod I have a 0.5 ohm dual coil with the same voltage of 4.4 which is obviously giving significantly greater power, but will it give me less run time as a result?

Yes, lower resistance consumes more power which drains the battery faster. 

It's possible to calculate the difference in run time pretty closely based on atomizer power.  Here's how;

Calculate atomizer power with voltage squared over resistance. 

Divide atomizer power by battery voltage to get battery current.  Use a nominal 7.4V for series cells using a step down converter or 3.7V for single or parallel cells using a boost converter.

Divide the cell's mAh by battery drain to get run time in hours.  For multiple cells, sum the mAh of the cells.

Divide run time (in seconds) by a nominal hit length of 3 seconds to calculate the number of hits on a charge.

It's not exact since there's losses neglected, hit length varies, and battery voltage is not constant, but it will give you a good idea when comparing one atomizer to another.

Offline CraigHB

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #231 on: April 15, 2014, 12:16:03 AM »
I started soldering the chip and was wondering if this looks ok?

It's "ok", but you could do a little better.  What you could try is binding your group of elements prior to soldering with a wire wrap using a fine strand from some speaker wire.  That will hold things together when applying heat and things won't move when the joint cools.  It will also allow you to heat the connection evenly and completely.  For any solder connection you want to avoid any movement in the elements while the solder is transitioning from liquid to solid.  That pretty much trashes the connection.

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The chip did seem to get quite hot when soldering, although I did start and stop making sure to not let it get too hot. Is it possible for the chip to become damaged from too much heat, from soldering?

It's actually better not to heat the connection any more often then you have to.  In other words, you'll do more damage removing heat and re-applying it then just keeping it hot for the duration of the job.

As far as overheating, it depends on what soldering tool you are using.  If you are using a proper station set to the correct temperature, it's actually quite unlikely you would overheat the board and damage it.  If using a cheap pencil iron, it's likely you would overheat the board and damage it.

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My last question is if any of you have used a strip of metal as a ground. I used keystone battery contacts instead of a battery holder, making it somewhat difficult to solder every ground to it. And the box is made out of wood so I cant really make that the ground either. Any tips?

You can buy bus bars designed for this purpose.  It's something done commonly.  A bus bar should be solid copper plated with a tarnish resistant material like nickel or tin-nickel.  Don't use steel, it's not a very good conductor and is not resistant to corrosion at all.  Stainless is also a poor material.  It's not a very good conducting metal and has poor contact performance due to the chromium oxide surface layer it forms (that's what makes it stainless).

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #232 on: April 15, 2014, 12:39:23 AM »
Thank you Craig. I'll definitely try the wire wrap that you suggested. I solder pretty much all day (I work as a camera repair tech), and we have Weller stations which get the job done with ease (at least when working on camera pcb's). However, I cant really spend the big bucks on a station like that at the moment. But, you're right, i'm using a radioshack cheap-o wand at the moment. It's been difficult to work with. With that being said, I might just bring the supplies into work and use our station.
Is their a certain temp I should be working at when soldering the okr? All i know is that the set temp at work for the stuff we're doing, is 750. As for wrapping the cap and resistor legs to the okr pins (that is what you're talking about when you say binding the elements correct?), should i just leave the speaker wire in the joint..? I don't see how i could get it out afterwards, at least without the joint coming apart. Thanks again.

Edit: I will look into the bus, however i have this lying around: http://i.imgur.com/uHDG8fc.jpg . I believe it is brass, however I dont know how i'd tell for sure.

Offline CraigHB

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #233 on: April 15, 2014, 01:02:11 AM »
600F is the ideal temperature for soldering with 60/40 or 63/37 tin-lead solder.  A 25W pencil can be as high as 900F when soldering small components.  It can get below 500F when soldering large components.  Since the temperature is not regulated and the tips are usually pretty crappy it's almost impossible to solder electronics well with one.  They're really only good for stained glass and leather work.

If you do much electronics soldering at home, a soldering station will be well worth the expense.  You don't have to spend a lot.  If money is a real problem, you can get an inexpensive Chinese made station for around $50 that will work well.  There's a couple brands people have recommended on the forum here, but I'm sorry I don't recall the names.  You can probably do a forum search and find the threads that mention them.

As far as the wire wrap, yes, just bind the joint tightly with the filament wire then twist twist tie the filament ends.  Leave it in there when you solder the joint.  Afterwards, use some flush cutters to remove the tail left behind.  It will make soldering components and wires to those headers hugely easier.


« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 01:17:30 AM by CraigHB »

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #234 on: April 15, 2014, 04:58:09 AM »
Thanks for the battery use formula Craig, very useful.

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #235 on: April 15, 2014, 08:30:06 AM »
Fullthrown,
I'm not solder master but I picked up my soldering station from radio shack a few years ago for about $25, it's 25W and 40W. Worked pretty good for some LED project's I was building.

That bus looks like brass to me, I don't know of any other metals that are a similar color to brass.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 08:35:14 AM by Jasen »

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #236 on: April 15, 2014, 10:38:47 AM »
Brass is a commonly used bus bar material, the main advantage is the metal is much more durable than copper and can carry threads, however brass still requires a corrosion resistant plating and has about half the conductivity of copper.  The performance is not as good electrically, but much better structurally.  Brass is a good material for tube mods since it has much better electrical performance than stainless steel (about 20 times better) and is still pretty strong, though stainless is a lot tougher.

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #237 on: April 15, 2014, 11:14:02 PM »
Thanks for all the input Craig. I wired everything up and nothing happend  :wallbash: . Im thinking its my poor soldering job. I used a small copper bar as a bus, but it could really be anything that is making it not work. I'll try again this weekend. Is using perf board for soldering the small components onto the okr a common thing? Im thinking it will save a lot of time and hassle.

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #238 on: April 16, 2014, 03:06:12 PM »
Sorry for dragging this on, but im posting here because it wouldn't let me start a new topic. I found out that it didn't turn on because one of the batteries wasn't making contact with the positive contact. I resoldered the wires to the positive contact and turned it on. I could see smoke at first so I immediately took the batteries out. The contacts were VERY hot. The only other thing that was hot was the mosfet, and it was also VERY hot. Everything seems to be wire correctly. The only thing that looks like it could cause a problem is the soldering on the battery contacts and the soldering on the makeshift (copper) ground bar. Can someone take a look at these pictures and tell me if anything stands out, or where i should even start to check what went wrong: http://imgur.com/a/deGpc

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #239 on: April 16, 2014, 05:04:21 PM »
Sorry to hear that, but you definitely fried something.  When you see smoke it's too late.  Best to thing is to post a wiring diagram, pretty hard to tell where you went wrong from photos.  That's a task even when you have a circuit in-hand.  People do post photos of their circuits a lot asking others to check them, but I never look at those.  Some more generous people do.  Checking the wiring diagram is correct is about the most you can expect, hooking it up per the diagram is up to you.

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #240 on: April 17, 2014, 02:30:05 PM »
Sorry for dragging this on, but im posting here because it wouldn't let me start a new topic. I found out that it didn't turn on because one of the batteries wasn't making contact with the positive contact. I resoldered the wires to the positive contact and turned it on. I could see smoke at first so I immediately took the batteries out. The contacts were VERY hot. The only other thing that was hot was the mosfet, and it was also VERY hot. Everything seems to be wire correctly. The only thing that looks like it could cause a problem is the soldering on the battery contacts and the soldering on the makeshift (copper) ground bar. Can someone take a look at these pictures and tell me if anything stands out, or where i should even start to check what went wrong: http://imgur.com/a/deGpc

See the PM I sent..........

Offline david4500

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #241 on: April 27, 2014, 07:15:27 PM »
anyone have a recommended pull down resistor value for an Okr T6? is it 10Kohm?
« Last Edit: April 27, 2014, 10:02:51 PM by david4500 »

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #242 on: April 27, 2014, 08:59:13 PM »
first off would like to say thanks to everyone posting in this thread very helpful, I'm a noob 1st time modder who failed today. I tried to build using the okrt10 as soon as I popped the 1st battery in something sparked by the pot and I never got anything out of it after that  raged:, I think the positive wire from the pot was touching the metal enclosure I'm using. I humbly ask someone to tell me if  that would that fry the chip and if I'm using the rite parts.   

okr t10
220 ohm 1/8 watt carbon film resistor
3 amp momentary push button switch
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/3352T-1-201LF/3352T-201LF-ND/1088344

followed this schematic    [img=http://s28.postimg.org/53i3evesp/mod_diagram.jpg]

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #243 on: April 28, 2014, 06:55:04 AM »
first off would like to say thanks to everyone posting in this thread very helpful, I'm a noob 1st time modder who failed today. I tried to build using the okrt10 as soon as I popped the 1st battery in something sparked by the pot and I never got anything out of it after that  raged:, I think the positive wire from the pot was touching the metal enclosure I'm using. I humbly ask someone to tell me if  that would that fry the chip and if I'm using the rite parts.   

The trimmer portion of the circuit is negative. Shorting to the case would not cause a short.
Did you accidentally install the battery backwards?
What type of capacitors did you use? Did you mistakenly use electrolytic and wire them backwards?
On your schematic, between Pin 1 and 3 you show something "X" out. Meaning you did not cross wire them? Am I correct?

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #244 on: April 28, 2014, 09:03:52 AM »
anyone have a recommended pull down resistor value for an Okr T6? is it 10Kohm?

I don't use the Remote Pin but I believe it's a 10K ohm

Offline runawaytrainn

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #245 on: April 28, 2014, 11:47:32 AM »
Hi breaktru , the caps that I used I made sure to connect the longer lead to pins 2 and 4, the x on the schematic is a resistor that was eliminated. As far as the battery I'm sure I put it in correctly the sled I used was prewired. I connected pin 2 to switch pin 3 to  trimmer sled neg and atty neg, pin 4 to atty connector , pin 5 to trimmer with inline resistor , sled positive to other switch lead. I'm waiting on another trimmer and chip I ordered because I broke the lead off the trimmer I had and I didn't know if I fried the chip. Thanks for your help breaktru you don't know how much I appreciate it...

Offline mamu

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #246 on: April 28, 2014, 12:01:54 PM »
The battery sled was pre-wired in series?

Offline runawaytrainn

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #247 on: April 28, 2014, 12:27:54 PM »
Hi mamu, this is the one I used

http://m.ebay.com/itm?itemId=191148025778
« Last Edit: April 28, 2014, 01:00:05 PM by runawaytrainn »

Offline runawaytrainn

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #248 on: April 28, 2014, 01:01:46 PM »
I really appreciate  your responses to this I'm sooo bummed out about this..

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Re: OKR-T/10, T/6, T/3 schematic circuit
« Reply #249 on: April 28, 2014, 01:20:44 PM »
Shrug it off and chalk it up to learning experience, runaway.  I've fried a few boards in my time.  :yes"

The sled is in series so you're good to go there.  But the contacts in that sled may cause issues as they have high contact resistance.  Consider using a Keystone 18650 batt sled instead - they're rated for both high amps and low contact resistance.

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